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A Revelation of Christ

25 Jul

In order to avoid too much repetition, given that the Psalms do tend to somewhat repeat themselves (leading to me repeating myself in some of my posts), I’ve decided to move for a bit to the book of Revelation. We will return to where we left off in the Psalms once we’ve finished Revelation. With that said, the passage we’ll start off looking at is in Revelation 1, verses 1 through 2:

The revelation of Jesus Christ, which God gave him to show to his servants the things that must soon take place. He made it known by sending his angel to his servant John, who bore witness to the word of God and to the testimony of Jesus Christ, even to all that he saw. (Revelation 1:1-2)

The interesting thing about John’s choice (which is reality is God’s choice) to start off the book in this way, is that it somewhat sets the scene for the rest of the book. “The revelation of Jesus Christ,” tells us that this is a revelation of Jesus Christ. I hate to restate the obvious, but it’s important to know that the book is intended to be read as a revelation of Christ. Not as a book about revelations about life, or for that matter of any other subject; though we can certainly learn lessons from it that we can and should apply in our own lives. So then, essentially, we can know that everything we read is meant to reveal some characteristic of Christ to us.

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5 responses to “A Revelation of Christ

  1. gary

    September 12, 2013 at 3:07 PM

    Hebrew children in the Old Testament were born into God’s covenant, both male and female. Circumcision was the sign of this covenant for boys, but the sign was not what saved them. Faith saved them. Rejecting the sign, circumcision, for boys, either by the parents or later as an adult himself, was a sign of a lack of true faith, and therefore the child was “cut off” from God’s promises as clearly stated in Genesis chapter 17:

    “Every male among you shall be circumcised. 11 You shall be circumcised in the flesh of your foreskins, and it shall be a sign of the covenant between me and you. 12 He who is eight days old among you shall be circumcised. Every male throughout your generations, whether born in your house or bought with your money from any foreigner who is not of your offspring, 13 both he who is born in your house and he who is bought with your money, shall surely be circumcised. So shall my covenant be in your flesh an everlasting covenant. 14 Any uncircumcised male who is not circumcised in the flesh of his foreskin shall be cut off from his people; he has broken my covenant.”

    What was the purpose of this covenant with Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob? God tells us in the beginning of this chapter of Genesis:

    “And I will establish my covenant between me and you and your offspring after you throughout their generations for an everlasting covenant, to be God to you and to your offspring after you.”

    This covenant wasn’t just to establish a Jewish national identity or a promise of the inheritance of the land of Caanan, as some evangelicals want you to believe. In this covenant, God promises to be their God. Does God say here that he will be their God only if they make a “decision for God” when they are old enough to have the intelligence and maturity to decide for themselves? No! They are born into the covenant!

    If Jewish children grew up trusting in God and lived by faith, they then received eternal life when they died. If when they grew up, they rejected God, turned their back on God, and lived a life of willful sin, when they died, they suffered eternal damnation. Salvation was theirs to LOSE. There is no record anywhere in the Bible that Jewish children were required to make a one time “decision for God” upon reaching an “Age of Accountability” in order to be saved.

    Therefore Jewish infants who died, even before circumcision, were saved.

    The same is true today. Christian children are born into the covenant. They are saved by faith. It is not the act of baptism that saves, it is faith. The refusal to be baptized is a sign of a lack of true faith and may result in the child being “cut off” from God’s promise of eternal life, to suffer eternal damnation, as happened with the unfaithful Hebrew in the OT.

    Christ said, “He that believes and is baptized will be saved, but he that does not believe will be damned.”

    It is not the lack of baptism that damns, it is the lack of faith that damns.

    Gary
    Luther, Baptists, and Evangelicals
    An orthodox Lutheran blog

     
    • Joshua Cleveland

      September 13, 2013 at 11:03 AM

      Hi Gary, and thanks for taking the time to leave a comment… Forgive me though, as I’m not entirely sure what it is your trying to get across here. What exactly was it in the post that you didn’t agree with?

       
      • Gary M

        September 13, 2013 at 11:51 AM

        I apologize, I don’t know why I posted this comment on your blog. Maybe I saw another of your posts related to baptism and then got mixed up in clicking on “leave a response”.

        Sorry!

         
      • Joshua Cleveland

        September 14, 2013 at 7:26 AM

        Not a problem at all, we all make mistakes. If it was one of my posts which prompted you, I’d be interested to know which one (should you ever find it)… After a while I’ve found that I tend to forget about some of my older posts.

         

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